Book Review – The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

 TSED

Seventeen-year-old Twylla lives in the castle. But although she’s engaged to the prince, Twylla isn’t exactly a member of the court.

She’s the executioner.

As the Goddess embodied, Twylla instantly kills anyone she touches. Each month she’s taken to the prison and forced to lay her hands on those accused of treason. No one will ever love a girl with murder in her veins. Even the prince, whose royal blood supposedly makes him immune to Twylla’s fatal touch, avoids her company.

But then a new guard arrives, a boy whose easy smile belies his deadly swordsmanship. And unlike the others, he’s able to look past Twylla’s executioner robes and see the girl, not the Goddess. Yet Twylla’s been promised to the prince, and knows what happens to people who cross the queen.

However, a treasonous secret is the least of Twylla’s problems. The queen has a plan to destroy her enemies, a plan that requires a stomach-churning, unthinkable sacrifice. Will Twylla do what it takes to protect her kingdom? Or will she abandon her duty in favor of a doomed love?

 

Author – Kiera.

Before we get going I just have to take a moment and appreciate the beauty that is this book’s cover! Having read the book I like to think it has a meaning all of it’s own. Something along the lines of being your own poison. The story about the two wolves comes to mind, the stronger one being the one you feed.

Anyway, I digress!

So, you may have read the synopsis and thought – hang on a minute, that sounds a lot like Shatter Me. While on the very surface it may seem that way and I know the whole death by touch concept isn’t new, but let me assure you it is nothing like it.
This is an amazing fantasy tale filled with religion and lore and antiquity.

We follow our main character Twylla who is (as you may have guessed) the Sin Eater’s Daughter. When a person dies food is laid out on their coffin, each item represents a sin they have committed. When all the food is eaten they are relived of these sins and can go on to the afterlife. Twylla is in training to become the next Sin Eater, but one day the queen arrives at her house and tells her that she is actually the embodiment of Daunen, who is the child of the gods. She goes to the castle and is betrothed to the prince and that’s when things start to go wrong.
Don’t you just hate it when that happens.

Religion plays a massive part in the book, though not in a conventional way, and I really enjoyed learning about the practice of Sin Eating and what it entailed. The way religion is portrayed in the book is as a tool. It is used to control the masses and is very effective in that way. Twylla is a part of it, but as an outsider I think she is always aware of the consequences of having so much power. At the same time she is young and not completely immune to the calling it has.

Now I will warn you; there is a love triangle. However I think this is one I can actually understand. Twylla is torn between what she wants and what she thinks is right, and this seemed to cause her to develop as a character throughout the story.
There is a lot of information to take in throughout the story, but this is somewhat balanced out by the minimal world building. It almost wasn’t important that there was no world building as the driving forces of the book were the religion/politics and the characters.

I won’t say too much more, as there are lots of things to uncover as you read,  but I have to say all my predictions for how it would all play out were completely wrong!

I need someone else to have read this book so I can talk to them about it! Anybody..?

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One thought on “Book Review – The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

  1. I really enjoyed this book, and I felt it used a lot of quite well-worn tropes (the evil queen, primitive religions, medieval world and love triangles) but made them feel fresh. Plus I had a little soft spot for Prince Mereck… Whilst I didn’t find it amazing, I did really enjoy it and can’t wait for the second one.

    Liked by 1 person

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